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  • Child Labor and Exploitation in Bangladesh

    Child labour and exploitation in Bangladesh

    1. Audiovisual

    Child labour and exploitation in Bangladesh

    According to Anti-Slavery International, bonded labour – or debt bondage – may be the least known form of slavery, yet it is the most widely used method of enslaving people. The International Labour Organization (ILO) estimates that there are about 250 million economically active children (individuals below 18 years old) worldwide. 61% of these workers – roughly 153 million – are in Asia. Around half of the economically active children are working full time and 20-30% about 30 to 46 million

    – … Read more

  • Child mortality in Chad

    07.26

    2013

    Chad, Bebedjia, May 2013

    Child mortality in Chad

    El infierno más bonito que conozco

    1. Audiovisual

    Child mortality in Chad

    The arrival of so many refugees has worsened significantly basic statistical indicators for children in Chad. The rates of infant mortality, under-five and maternal mortality are extremely high. One in five children will die before their fifth birthday.
    Only half of Chadian children are fully immunized against major preventable diseases. Acute respiratory infections, malaria and diarrheal diseases are the most common causes of death. HIV / AIDS affects 18,000 children under 14 years.

    Read more

  • Food security - Tanzania

    11.01

    2012

    Bolivia and Tanzania 2011 - 2012

    FOOD JUSTICE

    Children of the shadows

    Food justice

    There’s something seriously wrong with our food system. The world produces enough food to feed the entire planet and yet, 870 million people go to sleep hungry every night. In contrast, another 1,000 million suffer different forms of obesity; a disease which has already become chronic in many countries. More than a quarter of the food we produce ends up in the trash, as result of an inefficient marketing system and a model of consumption based on waste and capricious demands.

    Read more

  • "Children of the shadows", Immigrantion in South Africa.

    Children of the shadows

    Children of the shadows

    “There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way in which it treats its children.” Nelson Mandela
     
    As political and economic tides change across the African continent, often followed by waves of violence and uncertainty, so communities are uprooted and people are forced to leave their homes in search of greener pastures. At the tip of Africa, Johannesburg stands as a beacon of opportunity.

    Read more

  • Transsexuals in Brazil by Pep Bonet / NOOR

    08.30

    2012

    Brazil’s transsexuals by Pep Bonet / NOOR - April 2012 - Rio de Janeiro & Fortaleza

    All imperfect things

    All imperfect things

    All imperfect things

    Brazil’s transsexuals by Pep Bonet / NOOR – April 2012 – Rio de Janeiro & Fortaleza
     
    Transgender political activism in Brazil only began in the 1990s, as a result of the AIDS epidemic, in contrast to gay and lesbian mobilization for equal rights which dates back to the 1970s.
    Transgender people have been less successful than gay men and lesbians in gaining any form of public acceptance and legal rights.

    Read more

  • Do not crop any of the images without permission of the photographer.

    04.12

    2012

    Women and Microcredit in Bangladesh – January 2012

    Women and Microcredit in Bangladesh

    Women and Microcredit in Bangladesh

    Women and Microcredit in Bangladesh – January 2012

    Microfinance, also known as microcredit, has rapidly grown in Bangladesh during the 1990s and it has enjoyed correspondingly growing prominence.
    It was actually born in the aftermath of the country’s war of independence in the 1970s. The extreme poverty and hunger in that period led an Economics professor at the University of Chittagong, Muhammad Yunus,

    Read more

  • Women and Microcredit in the Philippines - February 2012

    03.14

    2012

    Women and Microcredit in the Philippines - February 2012

    Women and microcredit in the Philippines

    Women and microcredit in the Philippines

    Women and Microcredit in the Philippines – February 2012

    Microcredit is one of the most visible innovation in anti-poverty policy where it has been successful in bringing formal financial services to the poor.
    Microfinance programs have the potential to transform power relations and empower the poor—both men and women. In well-run microfinance programs,  there is a relationship of respect between the provider and the client that is inherently empowering.

    Read more

  • Women and microcredit in Burkina Faso

    02.26

    2012

    Microcredit and women empowerment in Burkina Faso

    Women and microcredit in Burkina Faso

    Women and microcredit in Burkina Faso

    Women and microcredit in Burkina Faso

    Microcredit is the most visible innovation in anti-poverty policy in the last half-century, and in three decades it has grown dramatically. Now with almost 130 million borrowers, microcredit has undoubtedly been successful in bringing formal financial services to the poor. Many believe it has done much more, and that by putting money into the hands of poor families (and often women) it has the potential to increase investments in health and education and empower women.

    Read more

  • Women and Microcredit in Morocco

    02.06

    2012

    Microcredit and women empowerment in Morocco

    Women and Microcredit in Morocco

    Women and Microcredit in Morocco

    Women and Microcredit in Morocco

    Women & Microcredit / Morocco
    Microcredit is the most visible innovation in anti-poverty policy in the last half-century, and in three decades it has grown dramatically. Now with almost 130 million borrowers, microcredit has undoubtedly been successful in bringing formal financial services to the poor. Many believe it has done much more, and that by putting money into the hands of poor families (and often women) it has the potential to increase investments in health and education and empower women.

    Read more

  • Microcredit and Women's empowerment

    12.19

    2011

    Microcredit and women empowerment in Guatemala

    Women and microcredit in Guatemala

    Microcredit and women empowerment in Guatemala.
    They are the hope, the hope of salvation of a society in permanent crisis. Against all odds these women build prosperity in an environment of inequality.
    Poverty is worse in indigenous areas of Guatemala (Mayan ethnic groups), where the word “future” is equivalent to constant improvement. Up to 78 percent of the population does not earn a monthly salary, which means that full employment only reaches between 22 and 28 percent of the population. Therefore, the self-employed become the true engines of community dynamics… Read more

  • Microcredit and Women's empowerment

    12.19

    2011

    Microcredit and women empowerment in Peru.

    Women and microcredit in Peru

    At the heart of the Andes there are women who have made out of their survival a positive fight. Betty, Cecilia Manizales, Melanie, Eufenia, Elba. These are the names of personal goals, a daily effort to challenge a destination: poverty. Thanks to microcredit, their dream of progress is already a reality. The Colca Valley is part of the department of Arequipa (Peru) and is located in the northeast corner of this region. One of the many problems of the area is isolation. Life unfolds in precarious conditions, in a difficult environment, some 4,000 meters above the sea level. People with l… Read more

  • Motörhead "European Tour"

    12.02

    2011

    Röadkill - Motörhead - Rock&Roll 2008-2010

    Röadkill – Motörhead

    Röadkill - Motörhead

    After being sacked from Hawkwind in 1975, supposedly for “doing the wrong drugs,” Lemmy Kilmister decided to form a new band, originally to be called Bastard. Realizing that this would preclude them from commercial acceptance, he eventually settled on Motörhead, after a song he had written for Hawkwind. His stated aim was for the outfit to be “the dirtiest rock n’ roll band in the world”. The name Motörhead was derived from a slang term for an amphetamine user.
    Read more

  • Zimbabwean immigrants in South Africa

    10.30

    2011

    Into the shadows, Urban survivors, Zimbabwe, South Africa

    Into the shadows – Urban survivors in South Africa

    Trailer Into The Shadows

    Each day, thousands of Zimbabweans attempt to flee Zimbabwe across the border to South Africa. However, persecution awaits them: they are met with hatred by South Africans, shunned by the police, many have been stripped of their rights, and the abuses they have suffered are most often unseen as the government turns a blind eye to their existence.
    Thousands of Zimbabweans face the threat of deportation back to Zimbabwe, so they seek the anonymity of the shadows in the overcrowded squatter camps and the urban slums.
    The violence against them is ruthless, random and unpred… Read more

  • Decriminalization of drugs in Portugal

    10.30

    2011

    Drugs, Portugal

    Portugal´s Drug Decriminalization

    In the late 90′s, Portugal had the highest rate of drug-related deaths in the European Union. Important measures were taken in 2000 to stop the epidemic, amongst them the decriminilization of drug users.
    Commonly known as harm reduction, Portugal’s drug policy is still unique in the European Union.
    In this reportage, Pep Bonet followed the social workers of Crescer Na Maior in Lisbon, an Association of Community Intervention that exists since 2001. A non-profit organization, Crescer Na Maior delivers kits (condoms, syringe/needle, alcohol wipes, distilled wate… Read more

  • Haiti Earthquake

    01.20

    2010

    Port au Prince, Haiti. January 2010

    Haiti earthquake

    On Tuesday 12 January, a catastrophique magnitude 7.0 M earthquake hit the island of Haiti. The earthquake killed more than 230.000 people, injured 300.000 and left 1 million homeless. Haiti is now facing sanitation and housing problems, has the rainy season is starting. The reconstruction of the country is the major concern of the government and the international community.Pep Bonet went to Haiti on assignment for “Gift of the Givers” Foundation to document the dramatic situation that Haitians are facing right now.
    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • Haiti

    06.29

    2010

    private hell, Haiti

    private hell / Haiti

    In June 2010, six months after the devastating earthquake hit the island of Haiti, Pep Bonet reported from Port-au-Prince, the capital to document the daily life of the inhabitants: from tent cities to mental hospital, the situation was not improving, even with the presence of around 11 000 United Nations peacekeepers.
    private hell / Haiti
    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • Hospice Haiti

    10.29

    2010

    Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    Hospice / Haiti

    In Petit-Goave, one of the suburbs of Port-au-Prince in Haiti, a hospice is hosting old and mentally challenged people. Following the earthquake, more people took refuge there. There are now 71 inmates while they were only 40 before the quake. The number is growing.
    The hospice was flooded during the earthquake and received no assistance.
    In the series “Hospice” Pep Bonet portrayed the daily life of these patients in June 2010.
    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • Voodoo

    10.28

    2010

    Voodoo, haiti

    saut d’eau voodoo festival, haiti

    Every year in summer thousands of pilgrims from all over Haiti make a religious journey to the village of Ville Bonheur and the sacred Waters of Saut d’Eau waterfall, a main pilgrimage site in Haiti since 1847. It is believed that 150 years ago the spirit of Virgin Mary has appeared on a palm tree close to the waterfall. Haitians wearing only underwear perform a bathing and cleaning ritual under the waterfall and Voodoo followers get possessed by the spirit of water.

    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • Haiti

    10.29

    2007

    Haiti, 2007

    Haiti

    The reflection of sunlight off the white houses is what gives Cité Soleil its name. But the daily reality of people living in this slum area in Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital, is one of deprivation and violence.
    Since the ousted of the former president Aristide in February 2004, the poorest country of the Western hemisphere has been living a time of violence and insecurity. Although elections which took place last February gave the hope of a new era for the Haitians, one year after results are disarming.
    Port-au-Prince remains an insecure and violent capital city, with large par… Read more

  • San Lazaro's Cult

    10.28

    2007

    17 Milagroso, San Lazaro ('El viejo'), Cuba 1999 - 2007

    17 Milagroso, San Lazaro

    17 MilagrosoSan Lazaro (‘el viejo’), also called Babalu Aye, is the most venerated saint in Cuba, an amalgam of a Christian saint and a Yoruba god worshiped for centuries by Afrocubans. Every year on San Lazaro’s Day (17 December), thousands of devotees from all over Cuba make a pilgrimage to the Santuario del Rincon, in Santiago de la Vega. A number of them are sick people and beggars, and they go to the little village 30 kilometers from Havana for different reasons, offering differing expressions of their religious feeling. They make the journey on their knee… Read more

  • Poland's Coal Industry

    Poland is the second largest coal producer and consumer in all of Europe and consequently one of the most polluted and polluting countries. From all fossil fuels brown coal is the one that has the biggest impact on climate change, producing 1/3 of the worlds CO2 emissions.Pep Bonet visited the region of Upper Silesia – one of the most heavily industrialized and polluted areas in the continent – to document the environmental and humanitarian impact of coal mining.
    During his trip to Poland Pep visited “Adamow”, a coal mine that pumps 80 to 120 million-m3 o… Read more

  • Steamland_Bonet024-300x200

    08.10

    2010

    Geothermal energy in iceland

    “steamland” – geothermal energy in iceland

    geothermal energy in iceland

    Iceland, August 2010.Due to the unique geological location of Iceland, the high concentration of volcanoes in the area is often an advantage for generating geothermal energy, heating and electricity. 100% of Iceland’s electricity comes from clean sources and the government plans within 30 years to become the first country to abandon the use of fossil fuels.Geothermal activity in the Hengill area is connected by three volcanic systems, which cover 112 square kilometers and form one of the most extensive geothermal areas in Iceland.
    Geothermal energy is heat ener… Read more

  • Lebanon War Child

    12.19

    2010

    War Child in Lebanon

    War Child in Lebanon

    The Lebanon conflict can be seen at different levels. A bloody internal conflict between different ethnic and religious groups has led to a protracted civil war. In addition, the population is divided into a pro-American and pro-Syrian camp. Finally, the conflict between neighboring Israel and the Palestinians creates much tension.
    Groups and refugees
    In Lebanon live 17 different ethnic and religious groups which are strictly separated from each other, including Sunnis, Shi’ites, Christians,
    Druze and Palestinians. In fact, each inhabitant of Lebanon, legally or il… Read more

  • CITY OF REST

    10.28

    2007

    City of rest / Sierra leone 2006 - 2007

    City of rest / Sierra leone

    Kyssy / City of rest

    The civil war in Sierra Leone (1991-2001) was labeled “the cruelest in Africa’s recent history”. It was characterized by destruction – of property, but more so of human lives and values. Tens of thousands of civilians died, hundreds of thousands were raped, burnt, tortured, enslaved, mutilated. Many patients in Kissy Mental Hospital are psychotic because of severe drugs and alcohol abuse, others are traumatized by having participated as a fighter in the war There is a lack of staff, especially of trained staff. The hospital was rebuilt in 2006 and now patient… Read more

  • Blind Faith

    10.29

    2003

    blind faith, Sierra Leone 2002 - 2003

    Blind faith / Sierra leone

    blind faith

    Even before its devastating civil war, Sierra Leone was the poorest country on earth (UNDP figures). It still is, and now it’s in shambles too. In the years since the peace agreement, people have tried to create new chances for themselves in a land where opportunities are rare. Their struggle, their determination to bounce back, sheds light on a side of Sierra Leone (and of Africa) that we don’t often get to see. It’s a story of stamina, pride and self-confidence. Against all odds. During the conflict, many had their eyes poked out by rebels. Eighty-five children liv… Read more

  • Somalia

    10.21

    2006

    Somalia, 2004-2006

    “The Invisible Trace” Somalia

    For 16 years following the collapse of the Siad Barré regime in 1991, Somalia remained the only country in the world without an effective central government. Six months of relative stability under the rule of the Union of Islamic Courts was brought to a rapid close in the final days of 2006, as Ethiopian militia allied to the forces of a transitional government (which was formed in Kenya in 2004, but had never assumed power) took over the capital Mogadishu. In January 2007 President Abdullahi Yusuf entered Mogadishu for the first time since taking office in 2004… Read more

  • Single Leg Amputee Sports Club (SLASC)

    12.19

    2007

    Sierra Leone, December, 2002 - 2007

    One Goal / Sierra leone

    One Goal – amputees soccer team
    Sierra Leone’s amputees are a grim legacy of its 1991-2001 civil war. One of the most brutal aspects of the conflict was the use of amputation as a weapon of fear, by both factions. Many of the victims were innocent young men, who were targeted in order to stop them fighting for an opposing side.At the Murray Town Camp for Amputees in Freetown, at one time home to over 2,000 people mutilated during the war, a group of these young men and boys have come together to form the Single Leg Amputee Sports Club (SLASC). The club has more th… Read more

  • Kissy Mental Home

    10.28

    2007

    Sierra Leone 2002 - 2007

    kissy mental home / Sierra Leone

    Kyssy / City of rest

    The civil war in Sierra Leone (1991-2001) was labeled “the cruelest in Africa’s recent history”. It was characterized by destruction – of property, but more so of human lives and values. Tens of thousands of civilians died, hundreds of thousands were raped, burnt, tortured, enslaved, mutilated. Many patients in Kissy Mental Hospital are psychotic because of severe drugs and alcohol abuse, others are traumatized by having participated as a fighter in the war There is a lack of staff, especially of trained staff. The hospital was rebuilt in 2006 and now patient… Read more

  • Jesus is Lord Ministry, Born again church

    10.30

    2002

    Born Again, Sierra Leone

    Born Again / Sierra Leone

    The Jesus Is Lord Ministry is the most popular Born Again Church in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
    Church services can last for up to eight hours and on an average Sunday 2500 people attend. They come for support of the Lord Jesus in coping with hardships or when they suspect to be possessed by a demon or evil spirit. Sister Dora Dumbuya helps people to come under the power of God through prayers and singing and in deep trance will exorcise evil spirits.
    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • UNAMSIL (United Nations mission in Sierra Leone)

    10.29

    2003

    United Nations, Sierra Leone

    United Nations mission in Sierra Leone

    (1991-2001) dates from 1995, when a special UN envoy was appointed, accompanied by a number of military observers, to try and negotiate a settlement and restore civil order. But as the situation worsened and atrocities became more widespread, it was clear that a more concerted effort was required. In October 1999, to help implement a tentative peace agreement of a few months earlier, the UN substantially increased its involvement with the establishment of UNAMSIL (United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone). Initially UNAMSIL comprised 6,000 military personnel and 260 military ob… Read more

  • Elections in Freetown

    10.30

    2007

    Elections Sierra Leone 2007

    Elections Sierra Leone 2007

    August 11, 2007, was a historical day for Sierra Leone as it successfully held its first post-war presidential and parliamentary elections, fully organized, supported and conducted by the country’s National Electoral Commission (NEC). Shortly thereafter, on September 8, 2007, the NEC held a presidential run-off election in which Mr. Ernest Bai Koroma, the candidate of the All People’s Congress (APC), the lead opposition party, won with 55 percent of the votes. Merely hours after the announcement of Mr. Koroma’s victory, the outgoing President, Mr. Ahmad Tejan Kabbah a… Read more

  • Artisanal MIners in Sierra Leone

    08.03

    2008

    Koidu, Sierra Leone. August 2008

    Artisanal Diamond Diggers / Sierra Leone

    Sierra Leone has suffered from conspicuously constrained economic growth. In spite of this negative development, the mining sector is believed to be the only sector that can easily contribute significantly to the country’s economic recovery and development process.
    The mining sector in Sierra Leone of which diamonds play a central role, was no doubt, the economic nerve center for the growth and development of the country in the 1960s and 1970s. It was a major source of revenue for the government and its proper management had a significant implication in the economic, social and … Read more

  • DARFUR

    10.19

    2004

    Darfur

    DARFUR

    An ongoing humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan has claimed between 200,000 and 400,000 lives, and caused the displacement of an estimated 2.5 million people. The conflict dates back to 2003, when two rebel movements, the SLA (Sudan Liberation Army) and the JEM (Justice and Equality Movement), began attacking government targets. In response to this, the government is said to have backed an Arab militia – the Janjaweed – to fight the rebels. The militias have been accused of numerous human rights abuses, constituting genocide according to many intern… Read more

  • Newborn and maternal mortality in Nigeria

    10.29

    2009

    child and maternal mortality in nigeria

    child and maternal mortality in nigeria

    Nigeria is a country of paradoxes. It has abundant resources but is one of the poorest countries in the world. It plays a leading role in African affairs, and yet it has one of the highest maternal and neonatal mortality rates in the world, with a shocking 700 babies dying each day and 136 mothers dying in, or as a result of, childbirth each day.
    These overall mortality rates mask the vast disparity between rich and poor. With children in the poorest families more than twice as likely to die before they reach their 5th birthday than those born to rich families. In 2006, a review of child health … Read more

  • Microcredit in Central America

    10.30

    2010

    Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, October 2010.

    Microcredit in Central America

    In many developing countries, self-employed represents more than 50 percent of the labor force. Access to small amounts of credit at reasonable interest rates allows poor people to move from initial, perhaps tiny, income-generating activities to small micro-enterprises. In most cases, microcredit programs offer a combination of services and resources to their clients including savings facilities, training, networking, and peer support.
    In this way, microcredit allows families to work to end their own poverty – with dignity and by helping them to better sustain them… Read more

  • Remarkable_SA_Bonet002-300x200

    10.29

    2009

    Remarkable South Africans

    Remarkable South Africans

    South Africa is often associated with its Apartheid history, with its crime, its increasing poverty and high level of HIV infections. However there is a very different story to be told of the country – one of hope, resilience and positive change.
    Together, Line Hadsbjerg and Pep Bonet set out to capture these stories of hope, interviewing individuals across the country who have made an inspiring contribution to the society in which they live. From great visionaries such as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, through to the “everyday giants” who have impacted humanit… Read more

  • Kingsville, Liberia
    Liberia is one of the poorest countries in the world. At US$190, its annual per capita GNP is roughly the equivalent of a dinner for four at a posh restaurant in a major capital city.
    Nearly half the population lives in extreme poverty. Only a small minority of families has clean water or sanitation. The country is in ruins after years of civil war and child mortality is frighteningly high – every hour, two children die.
    For Save The Children
    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • HIV AIDS AND TUBERCULOSIS IN LESOTHO

    10.29

    2007

    Lesotho, South Africa

    Tuberculosis in Lesotho

    Lesotho is a mountainous country located entirely within the borders of South Africa. It is home to more than 2 million people and has one of the highest HIV burdens in the world. The co-infection with the multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death among people with HIV infection.
    The importance of TB cannot be underestimated. Because it is transmitted through the air, unlike most other opportunistic infections, once it spreads in the HIV/AIDS population, tuberculosis can be passed on to other people in the general population.
    The Open Society Institute propo… Read more

  • ORPHANS IN SWAZILAND

    10.30

    2007

    orphans in swaziland

    Orphans in Swaziland – HIV&AIDS

    Swaziland, Mbangazuwe, NCP (Neighborhood Care Point)
    The HIV/AIDS pandemic has affected almost every family in the Kingdom of Swaziland. The Country has the highest percentage of HIV-positive people in the world, with nearly 36% of those between the ages of 15 and 49 living with HIV. More than 70,000 children have been orphaned by AIDS. According to UNADIS, the number of orphans will continue to grow at an alarming rate with a projection of 120,000 orphans in the Country by 2010.

    © Pep bonet
    Read more

  • HIV/AIDS AND DRUG ADDICTION IN NORTH EAST INDIA

    At the outermost bounds of a booming India, drug routes cut across the poor Northeastern states touching Myanmar. Produced in the Golden Triangle, pure heroine easily enters Mizoram, Manipur and Nagaland to fuel one of the fiercest Hiv-Aids epidemics India has to face. In the 1990s, massively injected with shared needles, heroine became the perfect vector for Hiv. In Manipur 40 to 60% of drug users could be infected. Today, the cost of heroine has led many drug users to switch to Spasmo-Proxyvon: injected, this pharmaceutical drug also causes gangrene. And amputation… Read more

  • Hiv & Aids in Honduras

    11.02

    2008

    Hiv & Aids in Honduras

    Honduras – HIV&AIDS

    Honduras has a generalized HIV epidemic, mainly due to sexual transmission. HIV prevalence is highest in specific groups, such men who have sex with men, sex workers, Garifuna and prisoners.
    Sadly, HIV/AIDS related diseases are the second most common cause of death in Honduras. This leads to countless orphans who are living with grandmothers or other extended family members with a limited ability to provide quality care.
    Participation of people living with HIV in the national response has grown; today the president of the Country Coordination Mechanism is a woman living with HIV… Read more

  • Transsexuals in Honduras

    05.18

    2008

    San Pedro Sula, Honduras

    Honduras – Forced identity – HIV&AIDS

    Forced Identity

    Honduras, April 2008The HIV/Aids epidemic is generally concentrated in high-risk populations such as men who have sex with men, commercial sex workers, prisoners, the Garifuna (an Afro-Caribbean population group) in the case of Honduras, street children and the security forces.Honduran homosexuals and transsexuals are common victims of family, church, political and even police harassment, hindering most from outing themselves. The number of violations of gay and lesbian human rights is increasing more rapidly than the number of organizations protecting th… Read more

  • Orphans_Portraits_Bonet012-300x200

    10.29

    2008

    Orphans Swaziland, Mbangazuwe

    Orphans in Swaziland – Portraits – HIV&AIDS

    The devastation of AIDS is creating a generation of orphans that face life alone in Swaziland.
    The HIV/AIDS pandemic has affected almost every family in the Kingdom of Swaziland. The Country has the highest percentage of HIV-positive people in the world, with nearly 36% of those between the ages of 15 and 49 living with HIV.
    Aids has contributed to reducing the average life expectancy in Swaziland from 58 to 32 years. (National Emergency Response Council on HIV/AIDS-NERCHA, 2007. Swaziland).
    Of extreme concern is the issue of orphans in a Country of just more than one million people a… Read more

  • Hiv_Ethiopia_Bonet008-300x200

    10.29

    2008

    hiv&aids, Ethipia

    Ethiopia – HIV&AIDS

    Every day, 12,000 people worldwide are infected by the HIV virus. Some 39.5 million people on the planet are now infected, and in 2006 alone, 2.9 million people died of AIDS-related illnesses. Some hope lies in drug treatment with ARVs (antiretrovirals) which have become more available to low-income, developing countries since the introduction of cheaper generic drugs, and deals negotiated with the major drug companies by the World Bank, UNICEF and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS.
    In 2004, Medecins Sans Frontieres launched the first program of free treatment with antiretroviral d… Read more

  • HIV/AIDS

    10.30

    2005

    hiv aids, angola

    Angola – HIV&AIDS

    Angola’s recovery from three decades of almost continuous war is being threatened by a rising incidence of HIV/AIDS. Millions of displaced people have been crossing the country or returning from abroad, contributing to the spread of the disease.
     
    Angola – HIV&AIDS
     
    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • HIV/AIDS

    10.30

    2006

    Death among the sugarcanes, Africa

    Death among the sugarcanes – HIV&AIDS

    I traveled to Africa with a feeling that I had given myself an impossible mission: to write about AIDS. But how could I write about the AIDS catastrophe in sub-Saharan Africa without people simply turning to the next page? How could Pep’s images and my text capture the attention of readers who would rather be spared? Readers who are tired of all the skeletal, dying people, all the overflowing graveyards, all the children abandoned after their parents have died.
    Solidarity has two preconditions. The first is knowledge. The second is the realization that events in distant lands do, in … Read more

  • HIV/AIDS - DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

    10.30

    2006

    democratic republic of congo, Bukavu, 2004- 2006, HIV&aids

    Democratic Republic of Congo – HIV&AIDS

    More than a decade of war has had a lasting impact on Bukavu, a city in the eastern part of Congo. Poverty is rife, the local government barely functions, and there is an almost complete lack of social services. For many, healthcare is unaffordable – a situation made especially urgent because of the high incidence of HIV/AIDS. The spread of the infection is closely associated with the war, due to the movements of militia, forced displacement of the population, and poverty which has forced many people into prostitution.
    © Pep Bonet
    Read more

  • HIV/AIDS IN KENYA

    10.30

    2004

    Kenya, HIV&AIDS

    Kenya – HIV&AIDS

    Every day, 12,000 people worldwide are infected by the HIV virus. Some 39.5 million people on the planet are now infected, and in 2006 alone, 2.9 million people died of AIDS-related illnesses. Some hope lies in drug treatment with ARVs (antiretrovirals) which have become more available to low-income, developing countries since the introduction of cheaper generic drugs, and deals negotiated with the major drug companies by the World Bank, UNICEF and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS.
    In 2004, Medecins Sans Frontieres launched the first program of free treatment with antiretroviral d… Read more

  • HIV/AIDS

    10.30

    2003

    hiv&aids, Zambia

    Zambia – HIV&AIDS

    In 2003, Pep Bonet visited Nchelenge in northern Zambia, and found that one person in four was HIV positive. The atmosphere was tight and suspicious. No one wanted to admit to their HIV status and women who were HIV positive were often beaten or abandoned.
    When Bonet returned in June 2005, he discovered a community largely transformed. People had rediscovered hope. This was partly due to the extraordinary strength and courage of a few individuals who, despite the stigma, had spoken openly about their status. Men and women who were HIV positive were working alongside hospital staff, a… Read more

  • Hiv & Aids in Honduras

    04.30

    2008

    Orphans of the Storm, Honduras

    Orphans of the Storm – HIV&AIDS

    Honduras has a generalized HIV epidemic, mainly due to sexual transmission. HIV prevalence is highest in specific groups, such men who have sex with men, sex workers, Garifuna and prisoners.
    Sadly, HIV/AIDS related diseases are the second most common cause of death in Honduras. This leads to countless orphans who are living with grandmothers or other extended family members with a limited ability to provide quality care.
    Participation of people living with HIV in the national response has grown; today the president of the Country Coordination Mechanism is a woman living with HIV… Read more

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